Category Archives: Process

Leveling up: Frequency Separation Editing

I’m really excited about my expanding photo retouching business. Learning more sophisticated editing techniques has been part of this effort so I can take on higher-end work.

The most exciting retouching technique I have picked up is Frequency Separation. I’d heard of the technique and looked into it some time ago, but the internet is full of conflicting ideas about best practices (who would have guessed?) with the only agreement being that everyone is doing it wrong. And a vocal minority saying it shouldn’t be done at all. With all the misinformation, I never got my head around the technique. What a mistake! (more…)

Rethinking the Photo Editing Workflow – Part 2

In Part 1 of this Photo Editing Workflow series I compared a traditional editing workflow with a new system I have been using in my last few projects. I pointed out some gotcha’s inherent in the traditional methods and potential improvements gained by transitioning to a new workflow. In this post I take a deeper dive into the nuts and bolts of how the new tools work. There are some workarounds suggested for areas the software is still catching up with my workflow. (more…)

Rethinking the Photo Editing Workflow – Part 1

This post is targeted at photo editors who work on large batches of images and need to produce a volume of edits on tight deadlines, with an eye to producing the most flexible final assets, suitable for digital & print usages.

Do you edit large batches of images? Maybe you manage a photo asset library, digitech photo shoots or shoot & edit your own photography? (more…)

Curved Dielines and Warping Tutorial – Part 2 – Create Dieline for a Cup Package

Concept to Keyline

In part one of this tutorial series, I showed how to adapt your rectangular label artwork concepts to a curved printer dieline. Sometimes you aren’t provided a dieline, just a package sample. It’s quite possible to create curved artwork without a target dieline. You’ll need a physical sample of the package to measure. And make sure you have some string. I’ll explain later.

After measuring and doing a bit of math, you can build your own Target Dieline. Once this is complete, the rest of the process is exactly the same as part one. (more…)